Lesson 1
When Engaging with Fiction Can Be Beneficial
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Prof. Gendler Tamar; PHIL 181: Philosophy and the Science of Human Nature; Spring 2011; YALE Open Courses: Yale University, Philosophy; http://oyc.yale.edu/philosophy/phil-181/lecture-24 Accessed 23/09/2014; License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA;

Professor Gendler explores some aspects of the question of what sorts of non-rational persuasion are legitimate for a government to engage in. She begins with two modern examples that illustrate Plato’s view on state censorship. She next turns to the text itself and outlines in detail Plato’s argument that since we are vulnerable to non-rational persuasion, and since a powerful source of such persuasion is imitative poetry, such poetry must be censored by the state.


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